The Matrix: 20th Anniversary

Still Great Entertainment 20 Years On

I managed to catch a screening at the Rio of this sci-fi masterpiece which has aged very well, in my opinion. It’s a little clunky in places and the dialogue is largely bad, but the story is so well plotted that there is a constant state of anticipation throughout, punctuated by beautifully executed action sequences. It is still a great movie.

What I remember most from seeing it 20 years ago is the sense of how much story is packed into it. I distinctly recall the scene when Neo wakes up from the Matrix into the real world and thinking “Holy crap! That’s just the first act!” What would typically have been saved as the big reveal at the climax of an ordinary movie was merely the first major plot point. And the rest of the movie is structured magnificently, with every scene carrying the story forward at such a speed you don’t really have time to stop and look around and question things. You just want to know what happens next, always against a backdrop of rising tension until you get to the action-packed third act that hardly rests for a second.

The movie does have a very 90s feel to it, but in a good way and without feeling actually dated. Much like ALIEN (1979), there is very little on screen that actually betrays its time of origin, yet The Matrix manages to distill the esthetic and tone of 90s cinema perfectly. The gunfight in the lobby that opens Act 3 is a perfect example. It still manages to be exciting as hell, and the entire movie is put together exceptionally well in every department, from production design to fight choreography to editing and many in between. The Wachowski siblings who conceived, wrote and directed it achieved something unique with this movie.

The film’s only weak point is its dialogue and one or two performances, although Hugo Weaving and Laurence Fishburne deserve special mention for their awesome charisma. There were many lines that got a groan from the audience I saw it with and I can’t blame them, some of the lines the actors have are dreadful. It’s a lot like Star Wars (1977) in that the dialogue is very poor but the plotting is excellent, with characters who are basically just there to advance the story. I like the way the filmmakers sprinkled little tidbits of philosophy throughout the film, but they are mostly the ones that are visualized (the metaphor of the Matrix is brilliant) and not so much the ones that are spoken aloud. It still manages to be a thinking person’s sci-fi/action movie, at any rate, with elements so perfectly balanced that there never feels like an excess of anything.

It’s a hell of a fun ride. Twenty years later and it hasn’t lost any of its appeal. I think The Matrix is a genuine classic of sci-fi cinema with big ideas and big set-pieces to keep you interested and entertained and is still a great film.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *