The Matrix: 20th Anniversary

Still Great Entertainment 20 Years On

I managed to catch a screening at the Rio of this sci-fi masterpiece which has aged very well, in my opinion. It’s a little clunky in places and the dialogue is largely bad, but the story is so well plotted that there is a constant state of anticipation throughout, punctuated by beautifully executed action sequences. It is still a great movie.

What I remember most from seeing it 20 years ago is the sense of how much story is packed into it. I distinctly recall the scene when Neo wakes up from the Matrix into the real world and thinking “Holy crap! That’s just the first act!” What would typically have been saved as the big reveal at the climax of an ordinary movie was merely the first major plot point. And the rest of the movie is structured magnificently, with every scene carrying the story forward at such a speed you don’t really have time to stop and look around and question things. You just want to know what happens next, always against a backdrop of rising tension until you get to the action-packed third act that hardly rests for a second.

The movie does have a very 90s feel to it, but in a good way and without feeling actually dated. Much like ALIEN (1979), there is very little on screen that actually betrays its time of origin, yet The Matrix manages to distill the esthetic and tone of 90s cinema perfectly. The gunfight in the lobby that opens Act 3 is a perfect example. It still manages to be exciting as hell, and the entire movie is put together exceptionally well in every department, from production design to fight choreography to editing and many in between. The Wachowski siblings who conceived, wrote and directed it achieved something unique with this movie.

The film’s only weak point is its dialogue and one or two performances, although Hugo Weaving and Laurence Fishburne deserve special mention for their awesome charisma. There were many lines that got a groan from the audience I saw it with and I can’t blame them, some of the lines the actors have are dreadful. It’s a lot like Star Wars (1977) in that the dialogue is very poor but the plotting is excellent, with characters who are basically just there to advance the story. I like the way the filmmakers sprinkled little tidbits of philosophy throughout the film, but they are mostly the ones that are visualized (the metaphor of the Matrix is brilliant) and not so much the ones that are spoken aloud. It still manages to be a thinking person’s sci-fi/action movie, at any rate, with elements so perfectly balanced that there never feels like an excess of anything.

It’s a hell of a fun ride. Twenty years later and it hasn’t lost any of its appeal. I think The Matrix is a genuine classic of sci-fi cinema with big ideas and big set-pieces to keep you interested and entertained and is still a great film.



Stars Trek Versus Wars

In the realm of popular sci-fi entertainment, Star Trek and Star Wars are the titans. Despite superficial similarities, the two are really designed for different audiences whose qualities come out in their respective fandoms. I think that Star Wars, with its simplistic good-versus-evil morality tale, is really more for children, while Star Trek skews toward a slightly more mature audience. Allow me to elaborate.

I think concepts like “good” and “evil” are basically childish. They are code for “us” and “them”, promoting a closed-minded tribalist attitude and enacting power fantasies of vanquishing the wrong and making everything right. As people grow and mature they should come to learn the complexity that attends life and how choices are not always so clean-cut.

Star Wars does touch upon the themes of point of view, but barely. It is still centrally and essentially a simplistic morality play in every iteration. Star Trek, on the other hand, tells a wider range of stories, some pulpy, some political and some just weird enough to challenge the way you think about your perceptions. One other key difference that distinguishes Star Trek as being for older audiences is the sexual content: Kirk and others are often in romantic liaisons whereas kissing is about as racy as Star Wars gets.

Writing this in the wake of Kelly Marie Tran’s on-line harassment by the worst elements of Star Wars fandom, I can’t help but think how basically immature they are. Personally, my favourite aspect of the new Star Wars movies is their on-screen diversity. I am all for seeing more faces and hearing more voices, but it is apparently a threat to some who are maybe not as secure in their own being. Of course these trolls exist in all forms of fandom, but I can’t imagine even the worst Star Trek fans being so loudly and vocally hostile that a cast member would remove him or herself from all social media.

Obviously, the trolls in this case are not representative of Star Wars fans in general and, as I say, Star Trek has it’s trolls too, but I can’t help but think there is something in the material they obsess over that fails to challenge their childishness because it is itself for children. I don’t think Star Wars fans have ever had the necessary humiliation that Trek fans were dealt by William Shatner’s “Get a Life” sketch on Saturday Night Live. That kind of public calling-out to stop taking it so seriously is precisely what Star Wars fans kind of need, certainly the cretins who attacked Kelly Marie Tran. I might even argue that The Phantom Menace was just that, but nobody seemed to get the point. They just got angry and bear the grudge to this day.

I’m not calling Star Wars fans immature, just the trolls. However, I do think being overly obsessed with a children’s entertainment might be bad for a person’s perspectives. I think it’s good to obsess over something until you figure out what it is about it that turns you on, but then you ought to pursue that quality in something more challenging, to test your assumptions and refine your perspectives instead of blunting them with endless repetition of the same thing and then getting upset when new product doesn’t meet your demands.  I’m still deeply in love with sci-fi, to which Star Wars was the gateway when I was a kid and  Star Trek sustained me as a teen. I just find they can’t deliver what I want from the genre anymore.